How do you draw?

Post your own art for critique and/or discussion.

How do you draw?

Postby Tsetzufu » Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:09 pm

How do you guys do your art? Do you slave away with paint for hours? Do you have a computer drawing pad thing? (I dont know what they're called), or do you draw on paper, and scan it.

This is to anyone who cares to reply :D
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Postby rvbtucker » Sun Jun 01, 2008 7:05 pm

paper, but I really just make up stories and put stick figures to stand in place cause for me, drawing takes for ever for just one character.
Yea thats right....I ZOMFGBBQWTFIDIDNTKNOWYOUCOULDDOTHATANDYOUNEEDANERFNERFZOMFGBLIZZHELPMECAUSEINEEDTOLEARNTOLPAYAHHHpwn
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Postby Hugginbear » Mon Jun 02, 2008 3:51 am

Most of the time I just do quick sketches in a little 6 x something sketchpad, mostly with a blue colored pencil. When I'm feeling ambitious or I'm drawing something for someone else, I'll scan the smaller blue sketch, blow it up, print it out, and start doing passes with a pencil. I'll scan and print it out a few times until I get my linework like I want it.

I do have a tablet for my computer, but I don't usually use it to actually draw with. I do use it to paint my drawings in GIMP and Open Canvas, though. I also paint traditionally, but haven't really been motivated to paint anything for a few months.

edit: like this
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Augh, I can never get it to just display the picture
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Postby Gabtraf » Mon Jun 02, 2008 4:47 pm

Hm, when drawing a comic I seem to make fun of an event that just happened to me or historic. Either then that I draw with pencil and paper :D
First light strokes and then after that detail them.
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Postby lappen » Wed Jul 02, 2008 3:22 pm

it always goes crappy for me.

i start out with the position (like a stick figure, easy sketch then draw out the body)
then i do the head, i can take hours on the head. then when i start on the body i usually screw up big time and then i go meh and stop drawing
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Postby Tankorr » Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:01 am

I draw them out by hand on paper first, but I never seem to follow the 'normal' procedure (i.e. starting with stick figures/basic shapes). Afterwards I scan it in to color it.

I kind of wish I had a tablet, but I think my mind wouldn't be able to follow the drawing without seeing my hand at the same time.
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Postby lappen » Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:34 am

Tankorr wrote:I draw them out by hand on paper first, but I never seem to follow the 'normal' procedure (i.e. starting with stick figures/basic shapes). Afterwards I scan it in to color it.

I kind of wish I had a tablet, but I think my mind wouldn't be able to follow the drawing without seeing my hand at the same time.


using basic shape technics really helps with the pose and looks and it's easier not to make your drawing look totally weird if you use a basic shapes.

you should try it ;)
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Postby Tankorr » Fri Jul 04, 2008 5:19 am

I've never really had problems with poses or proportions before. My mind just seems content with skipping that phase of preparation.
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I always...

Postby pickleninja » Fri Jul 04, 2008 7:29 am

I draw it out on spiral notebook paper...
trace it on printer paper in pencil...t
hen I go over it in black markers...
scan it into the computer...
and photo shop it....


whole process takes about 3-4 hours.


-Pickle
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Postby felldain » Sun Jul 06, 2008 2:22 am

I just start drawing straight away. When I used to draw from my head I was doing it so much that I could quite easily recall lines, shapes and curves so I'd establish a character rather quickly then work on it for another hour putting in detail. This only worked well for Imaginary animals though, in hindsight my humanoid drawings were atrocious.

When I began life drawing however there was much more emphasis on proportion and perspective. Often I'd start by placing a few points to mark where certain parts were located and to establish the size of the figure (to prevent its head occupying space outside of the paper) and then I'd just begin drawing.

When drawing figures its important that your prepared to constantly readjust your picture, else the end result will be awkward, spend the first 30 minutes critically analysing your work and you'll find you've saved yourself a lot of time for the next stages. It is also best to work on the whole body at once - rather than drawing from the head to the feet- you should be drawing quickly and simply (but accurately) all over and then spend about half an hour working out the contours of the body in more detail.

To those of you who are interested in improving your drawing skills i strongly recommend joining a life drawing class, Its very challenging and frustrating but extremely worth it. I probably made ten times as much progress this year in the quality of my work than the previous 3 years combined.
Oh and by the way i was being sarcastic!
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Postby Hugginbear » Sun Jul 06, 2008 4:24 am

felldain wrote:
To those of you who are interested in improving your drawing skills i strongly recommend joining a life drawing class, Its very challenging and frustrating but extremely worth it.


Agreed. Life drawing will drive you absolutely nuts, but if you really, really want to start figuring things out, there is absolutely nothing better. I think one of the biggest bonuses of life drawing is after a long time of drawing many different people, you start to cement structures into your mind. It actually becomes easier to just draw from your imagination, because you start to become intimately familiar with certain forms.

I'd hasten to add I don't think Felldain is saying, and I'm certainly not, that you need to take an art class if you want to draw. I personally don't think there's a 'wrong way' to do things.

That being said, there are things that will make drawing easier, make you more accurate, and help you create faster that you can learn in life drawing classes. There's nothing quite as motivating as knowing that the model is going to walk around during your break and see what you did. Nor is there anything that will make you loosen up more than having to capture a pose in 1-2 minutes.
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Postby pickleninja » Sun Jul 06, 2008 5:13 am

it isn't necessary to take an art class. It helps only because it forces you to draw alot and frequently.

The best thing you can possibly do to become a better artist is to draw often...study certain shape and structures, and stay persistant at what you do.


if you suck at hands, draw hands until you get it right....not in 1 pose, but many poses...if you suck at feet...draw feet a lot!

Humans have the unique ability to adjust and learn how to do things...and if you do something enough times, you'll get better.


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Postby lappen » Sun Jul 06, 2008 12:13 pm

yeah, training makes perfect, that's how we humans are made.

we can live in a desert for years, but still be able to change ourself to live in the northpole. we just need time.

and it's the same shit for drawing, just need time, draw as often as possible. waiting for a ZA raid to start? take a paper and draw something! perhaps your character?
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Postby felldain » Mon Jul 07, 2008 4:40 am

pickleninja wrote:it isn't necessary to take an art class. It helps only because it forces you to draw alot and frequently.


I think that is quite inaccurate, I used to draw a lot and my improvements were minimal. Its the drawing from observation that really helps imo the fact that I was in an educational environment also helped motivate me to really push myself and challenge my own mental blocks and laziness (for example with proportion and perspective)

And I've got to agree with you completely Hugginbear, the speed at which one can establish a human form, and even the number of lines required is improved dramatically. Even seasoned artists would benefit from the class as it is much easier to re-evaluate your own work and the tutor can always assist you in that too.
Oh and by the way i was being sarcastic!
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Postby The Great JT » Mon Jul 07, 2008 3:44 pm

Poorly.

That is all.
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